Central elementary

Central Elementary School in Banning has received a Silver PBIS distinction for 2019.

Four Banning schools have received a Silver rating from the California PBIS Coalition for their implementations of Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports features at their campuses.

New Horizons High School and Cabazon, Central and Hemmerling elementary schools were notified of their ratings Sept. 1.

Banning High School received a Bronze rating.

Schools apply to achieve ratings appropriate for what they best feel they are qualified for.

The PBIS approach is described by the Center for Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports at the University of Connecticut as a framework, which emphasizes “a process or approach, rather than a curriculum, intervention or practice” that focuses on evidence- or research-based behavioral practices.

The National Education Association explains PBIS as a general term for an initiative that refers to positive interventions used with students who demonstrate significant disabilities who engage in extreme forms of self-injury and aggression.

Banning High School principal Matt Valdivia shared his school’s accolades with the community.

The letter from the California PBIS Coalition informs the Banning High that the school’s name will be displayed on the California PBIC webpage and posted at the 4th Annual California PBIS Conference in Sacramento next month.

“The level received reflects the award you applied for, or the level for which you were qualified,” the letter, dated Sept. 1, states. “We sincerely appreciate your hard work and commitment toward implementing PBIS with fidelity and creating the conditions to maximize academic and social behavioral outcomes for all students.”

At the high school, Valdivia credits the school’s Alternative To Suspension program, run by Mickey Valdivia, and the Marriage and Therapy Programs run by counselor-on-special assignment Laura Khan and teacher-on-special assignment Sarah McNally, for their success.

Rather than kicking students out of school, which is punitive, ATS provides an in-school environment where someone who would traditionally be suspended for offenses elsewhere, is offered a safe, supporting environment on the school site to confront the issue — and their victim, and victims can reach out to their offenders, to get to the bottom of whatever caused the confrontation, to understand why it happened; and to determine how best to prevent it from occurring again.

The school also continues to receive average daily attendance funds, since the students stay in school.

In its fourth year, the ATS program is showing dividends, Mickey Valdivia says.

“There are an array of needs, whether they are social, emotional, athletic, financial — that students require assistance with,” he says. “We’re now seeing a positive cultural shift at Banning High School” as a result of PBIS programs.

There are technical qualifications for schools to apply for Platinum, Gold, Silver or Bronze ratings related to “tier fidelity inventory” related to the Schoolwide Positive Behavior Support programs.

Staff Writer David James Heiss may be reached at dheiss@recordgazette.net , or by calling (951) 849-4586 x114.

Staff Writer David James Heiss may be reached at dheiss@recordgazette.net , or by calling (951) 849-4586 x114.

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