Steve Barron

Steve Barron, CEO of San Gorgonio Memorial Hospital.

Steve Barron knows a lot about San Gorgonio Memorial Hospital.

For the past two years, he has served as interim chief executive officer and in November, the hospital’s board of directors approved him as their permanent CEO.

Barron spoke about the hospital and its projects at the Jan. 10 Good Morning Beaumont chamber breakfast.

Barron has spent 40 years in the industry and formerly was CEO of St. Bernardine Medical Center in San Bernardino.

Currently, there is new construction taking place at the hospital.

There is the new purchasing department.

Barron said that the hospital is raising money for a new CT scanner, which they hope to have operating in the next three years.

This will be the second CT scanner for the hospital.

San Gorgonio also is working on a neurology/stroke center, Barron said.

“This is pretty important,” he said. “With a stroke, you want to get it diagnosed in a short amount of time.”

The hospital also plans to have state-of-the-art surgery beds, said Barron.

The outpatient department has continued to grow over the past decade.

Barron said that in the past decade, there has been an increase in the number of outpatient surgeries.

In 2009, there were less than 5,000 outpatient discharges.

Today, the hospital has seen 10,000 outpatient discharges.

Barron said that the hospital will not have to transfer patients to another hospital with this next year.

They can stay right there at San Gorgonio Memorial Hospital. San Gorgonio Memorial Hospital has an important place in the San Gorgonio Pass area.

“This community really needs this hospital,” he said.

Staff Writer Julie Farren may be reached at jfarren@recordgazette.net.

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